Eat Smart Idaho at University of Idaho Extension
students walk on University of Idaho campus

Visit U of I

Learn about the many reasons the University of Idaho could be a perfect fit for you. Schedule Your Visit

Cook Smart

Save Time

  • Clear counters. Keep only a few appliances on your counters, if any. Store the rest in cabinets.
  • Keep things you use often in easy-to-reach places. Move items you seldom use to upper cabinets or another room. Give away items you never use.
  • Figure out how many of each kitchen item you need. Do you use more than one set of measuring cups at a time? Do you need five mixing bowls, or just two?
  • Create kitchen zones for specific tasks such as food storage, food preparation, cooking, baking and cleaning up. Keep appropriate kitchen equipment and tools in each zone. You may want to add an information zone for coupons, menus and recipes.

  • Post your menu where it is easy to see. (See Plan Your Meals in the Plan Smart section of this website.)
  • Look ahead to see what frozen foods you need to move to the refrigerator to thaw.

  • Cook once, eat twice. Double or triple recipes or cook two or more different meals with similar ingredients. Package meals in family-size portions. Refrigerate what you will use in a few days and freeze the rest.
  • Cook and freeze ingredients for future meals.
    • Brown and rinse ground beef, and then freeze it in recipe-size portions.
    • Roast a chicken or turkey, then chop and freeze it. Make soup stock from the bones and freeze it.
    • Cook rice or dried beans and freeze them in recipe-size portions.
  • Freeze muffins, bread and cookies.
  • Wash fresh fruits and vegetables in advance. Store them in the refrigerator. Some fresh produce, such as strawberries and mushrooms, shouldn't be washed until just before serving.
  • Shred cheese and refrigerate or freeze it for future meals. To help keep the cheese from clumping, you can add 1–2 tablespoons of cornstarch to the bag of shredded cheese and shake to mix.

Keep Your Food Safe

  • Wash hands and all surfaces often with hot, soapy water.
  • Wash fresh vegetables and fruits with running water before peeling, eating or cooking.
  • To avoid spreading germs to other foods, DO NOT wash meat and poultry.
  • Wash lids of cans before opening them.
  • Sanitize surfaces after washing them, especially surfaces that held raw meat, poultry, seafood or eggs.

To make a sanitizing solution:

  1. Mix 3/4 teaspoon bleach and 1 quart water in a spray bottle.
  2. Spray the solution on surfaces, let it sit for 1–2 minutes, then wipe the surface or let it air dry. Make fresh sanitizing solution every week.
  • Find more ways to .

  • Separate raw, cooked and ready-to-eat foods while shopping, cooking and storing foods.
  • Keep raw meat, poultry and seafood in covered containers on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator.
  • Use one cutting board for raw meats and a separate cutting board for foods that are ready to eat such as fruit, salad ingredients and bread. If only one cutting board is available, wash and sanitize it between uses.
  • Wash and sanitize all surfaces that come in contact with raw meat, poultry, seafood or eggs.
  • Learn more about .

  • Make sure cooked food reaches an internal (inside) temperature high enough to kill bacteria that cause foodborne illness:

Food

Minimum safe internal (inside) temperature

Steaks, chops and roasts (beef, veal, pork and lamb). Let the meat rest for 3 minutes before eating.

145°F

Fish

145°F

Ground meat (beef, veal, pork and lamb)

160°F

Eggs and egg dishes.

Cook eggs until yolks and whites are firm.

Don’t eat foods containing raw or undercooked eggs.

160°F

All poultry

165°F

Leftovers

165°F

Sauces, soups and gravy

Rolling, rapid boil

  • Insert the thermometer into the thickest part of the meat, poultry, or fish or into the center of the container of sauce, soup, gravy or leftovers. Make sure the thermometer does not touch any part of the bones, fat or pan. Insert the thermometer into the side of hamburger patties.
  • Hand wash the stem of the thermometer in hot, soapy water after use. Do not put the dial or digital display in water or wash the thermometer in the dishwasher.
  • Learn more about .

  • Refrigerate or freeze these foods within 2 hours (within 1 hour if the air temperature is above 90°F) to slow the growth of harmful bacteria:
    • Meat, poultry, seafood and eggs
    • Cooked food
    • Cut fresh fruits or vegetables
  • Store leftovers in shallow containers no deeper than 2 inches.
  • Allow cold air to circulate in the refrigerator by leaving some room between foods.
  • Keep the refrigerator at 40°F or below and the freezer at 0°F or below. Use an appliance thermometer to check temperatures.
  • Safely defrost food in one of three ways:
    • In the refrigerator on the bottom shelf on a plate.
    • In cold water that is changed every 20–30 minutes. Cook immediately after thawing.
    • In the microwave. Cook immediately after thawing.
  • Use or discard refrigerated food regularly. See the  for guidelines.
  • See .

Quiz—

Are you keeping your food safe? Take the following quiz to see how you are doing.

Clean

I wash my hands with soap and warm running water before preparing food.

Yes

No

I wash fresh vegetables and fruits before peeling them.

Yes

No

I wash fresh vegetables and fruits before eating them.

Yes

No

I wash fresh vegetables and fruits before cooking them.

Yes

No

I wash the counter tops after preparing food.

Yes

No

I wash the cutting boards after preparing food.

Yes

No

I sanitize surfaces after washing them, especially those that held raw meat.

Yes

No

Separate

I separate raw, cooked and ready-to-eat foods when shopping.

Yes

No

I separate raw, cooked and ready-to-eat items when cooking or preparing food.

Yes

No

I separate raw, cooked and ready-to-eat items when storing food.

Yes

No

I keep raw meat products covered on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator.

Yes

No

Cook

I have a food thermometer.

Yes

No

I use a food thermometer to check that my meat is done.

Yes

No

I use a food thermometer to make sure leftovers are reheated safely.

Yes

No

Chill

I do not let food sit out for more than 2 hours.

Yes

No

I store leftovers in shallow containers no deeper than 2 inches.

Yes

No

I keep an appliance thermometer in my refrigerator.

Yes

No

I keep an appliance thermometer in my freezer.

Yes

No

The temperature inside my refrigerator is below 40°F.

Yes

No

The temperature of my freezer is below 0°F.

Yes

No

I defrost food using one of the recommended methods: in the refrigerator, in cold water or in the microwave.

Yes

No

When I defrost food in cold water or in the microwave, I cook it immediately after thawing.

Yes

No


If you answered "no" to any of the statements, make changes to be more food safe.

Boost Nutrition

Vegetables

  • Add extra vegetables to scrambled eggs, soups, stews, casseroles, pasta dishes, stir-fry dishes, salads, muffins and some cakes.
  • Make main-dish salads.
  • Pile lots of fresh vegetables on sandwiches. Great options include lettuce, tomato, onions, cucumber and peppers.
  • Add spinach or other greens to smoothies.

Fruits

  • Add fruit to cereal and yogurt.
  • Make fruit smoothies with fresh or frozen fruit, fruit juice, yogurt, milk and ice.
  • Put dried or fresh fruit in waffles, pancakes, muffins or oatmeal.
  • Top salads with fresh canned, or dried fruits such as pineapple, strawberries, grapes, raisins and dried cranberries.
  • Try grilling fruit.

Beans and grains

  • Add beans, lentils or dried peas to soups, salads and dips.
  • Gradually replace refined grains with whole grains such as brown rice and whole-grain bread, cereal, crackers and pasta.

  • Trim fat from the outside of meat and take the skin off poultry before cooking.
  • Choose smaller portions of meat.
  • Limit your use of high-fat processed meats like bacon, sausage and bologna.
  • Bake, broil or roast instead of deep-fat frying or pan frying with a lot of oil or fat.
  • Chill meat drippings and remove the hardened fat.
  • Use less fat in baking. You can decrease fat by one-quarter or more in many recipes.
  • Choose fruit-based desserts instead of heavier, high-fat treats.

Make healthy substitutions to reduce fat

Original ingredient

Lower-fat substitute

Dairy

Whole milk

Nonfat (skim) or 1% low-fat milk

Yogurt

Low-fat or nonfat yogurt

Regular block or shredded cheese

Low-fat cheese or a smaller amount of stronger (sharper) cheese

Cottage cheese, cream cheese, or sour cream

Low-fat or fat-free versions

Protein

Fatty cuts of meat

Lean cuts of meat such as from the loin or round

Regular ground beef

Lean or extra-lean ground beef OR rinse cooked regular ground beef (See the recipe for the leaner ground beef under main dishes in the recipe section.)

1 whole egg

2 egg whites (¼ cup) or ¼ cup egg substitute

Chicken with skin

Remove skin before cooking

Oil-packed tuna

Water-packed tuna

Baking

1 ounce unsweetened baking chocolate

3 tablespoons dry cocoa + 2 teaspoons sugar +
1 tablespoon oil

Butter

Tub margarine with the lowest saturated fat. Light or low-fat margarines do not work well in baking.

Oil

Pureed fruit (applesauce, prunes, etc.) can be used for half the oil in many baking recipes.

1 cup chocolate chips

½ cup mini chocolate chips

1 cup oil in quick breads or cakes

½ cup pureed fruit or vegetable + ½ cup oil or buttermilk

1 cup chopped pecans or walnuts

½ cup nuts toasted to bring out the flavor

1 cup shredded coconut

½ cup toasted coconut plus ½ teaspoon coconut extract

Other fats and oils

Mayonnaise

Light or nonfat mayonnaise or

½ light mayonnaise + ½ nonfat yogurt

Salad dressing

Reduced–fat or fat-free dressing


Reduce Food Waste

Americans waste about 14% of their food purchases. That means a family that spends $175 weekly on groceries could waste $1,275 per year!

There are a lot of ways you can decrease food waste:

  1. Start your menu planning with food you have in your pantry, refrigerator and freezer.
  2. Include leftover nights on your menu.
  3. Pay attention to foods you throw away. Next time, buy less—only as much as you can eat while the food is still fresh.
  4. After shopping, rotate older foods to the front of the pantry, refrigerator and freezer and use them before newer foods.
  5. Store refrigerated food in shallow, see-through containers.
  6. Dedicate an area of the refrigerator for leftovers. Train family members to look there for quick meals and snacks.
  7. Freeze food for later use. Package or wrap it well and include a label and date.

別れさせ屋 岐阜

best-cooler.reviews/

www.www.220km.com.ua